Interface Culture

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Definition

“An interface may be described as a common boundary between two systems. The interface between transportation systems is the most neglected element that the passenger is force to tolerate. The attitude of transportation system operators seems to be, ‘leave the driving to us but how you get aboard and where you go when you get off is your problem’. Improvement in the attraction and holding of riders is needed more than anything else except frequent service.” [1]

Interface culture is now occurring when with the rise of fractal prosthetics. We have screens inside of machines, prostheses inside of prostheses. Software is the liquid manifestation of our prosthetic devices.

The point is that our daily existence is normally filled with short walks and passing through interfaces. It is not the number that we remember but rather the poor quality of them and the time spent in moving through them.[2]

People will take the route with less interface changes, and CDs are no longer lightweight. That is, they involve more activation energy to achieve their goal than does digital media.

Every interaction we have is trying to get something done. Every button we push we're having an interaction that has a specific goal in mind. At his task that hse as a, point -- how do we balence this idea of acheiing certian goals -- press buttons and acheieve these certain sorts of organic relationships.

There's design to make that flow manageable. There are also creative experiences that disrupt that flow -- stop, and look at whatever is here. Even mixing it with street theatree.You have people congregate that has flows of information that cause people to make decisions on future actions. We're tryin to get something done on these interfaces.

References

  1. Comments and Excerpts from Urban Structure, 1968. Paul Elek. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York. The Interfaces (Page 76-77).
  2. Ibid.

Topics in Interfaces

Interface Resolution | Interface Culture | The Prosthetic Impulse: From a Posthuman Present to a Biocultural Future | Fractal Prosthetics | Prosthetics And Their Discontents