Difference between revisions of "Hyperculture"

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===Definition===
 
===Definition===
Supermodernity is a term used to describe an accelerated form of modernity that accelerates the transformation of time and space. Modernity is defined as that which integrates the new and the old such that both become familiar in the same space. Supermodernity, in contrast, is characterized by its excesses. There are three such excesses in supermodernity. In contrast to accounts of postmodernity in which there is a general collapse of an idea of progress, in supermodernity there is an acceleration of history that results, not in meaninglessness, but in the excess of meaningful events. This excess of historical significance, rather than leaving us complacent, makes us even more avid for meaning.  
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Hyperculture or supermodernity is a term that refers to the staggering rate of change in modern technological societies.<ref>Bain, C. et al. (2002). Transitions in society: the challenge of change. Toronto: Oxford University Press.</ref> This accelerated form of modernity is a result of the transformation of time and space in postmodern society.  
  
Supermodernity is the essence of a totally syncretic universe, where everything blends together. All religions, arts, cultures, scientific techniques, all business commerce and trade. The ultimate metling pot of thought, image, and existence. This is the natural outcome of living in a society that is becoming more commodified, with less friction dividing it. Now all one does is pick up the pieces and put them together in new ways. Everything has new value now. Everything may be used to make something. Evidence of this is the remix culture of YouTube videos, the musician GirlTalk, and the recommodification of history and historical objects by hipster culture. In a supermodern era, all of history is in the cultural domain. All of culture is capable of being processed, wound down, and remixed.  
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Hyperculture is the natural outcome of living in a digitally connected society capable of rapid communication. Value and excitement can be created by simply remixing objects from completely different eras and forms. What might have been opposing objects can be put together to form new meaning. For instance, one can take the shape of a rocketship, hollow it out, attach a coffee cup handle and submit it to a 3D printed object marketplace, immediately creating a new product available for on-demand consumption. In response, the new object may be covered by bloggers and trend-spotters and be given access to a immediate market.  
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Everything may be used to make something. All culture and history, and all materials. Evidence of this is the remix culture of YouTube videos, the musician Girl Talk, and the re-commodification of history and historical objects by hipster culture. In a hypercultural era, all of history is in the cultural domain, all culture is capable of being processed, wound down, and remixed. Everything is a Lego block for creating something new. Hyperculture is the essence of a melting system of objects and value where everything blends together. All religions, arts, cultures, scientific techniques, all business commerce and trade are up for being remixed and reconsumed. The ultimate melting pot of thought, image, and existence.  
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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Latest revision as of 20:36, 9 November 2012

Supermodernity-maggie-nichols.jpg

Definition

Hyperculture or supermodernity is a term that refers to the staggering rate of change in modern technological societies.[1] This accelerated form of modernity is a result of the transformation of time and space in postmodern society.

Hyperculture is the natural outcome of living in a digitally connected society capable of rapid communication. Value and excitement can be created by simply remixing objects from completely different eras and forms. What might have been opposing objects can be put together to form new meaning. For instance, one can take the shape of a rocketship, hollow it out, attach a coffee cup handle and submit it to a 3D printed object marketplace, immediately creating a new product available for on-demand consumption. In response, the new object may be covered by bloggers and trend-spotters and be given access to a immediate market.

Everything may be used to make something. All culture and history, and all materials. Evidence of this is the remix culture of YouTube videos, the musician Girl Talk, and the re-commodification of history and historical objects by hipster culture. In a hypercultural era, all of history is in the cultural domain, all culture is capable of being processed, wound down, and remixed. Everything is a Lego block for creating something new. Hyperculture is the essence of a melting system of objects and value where everything blends together. All religions, arts, cultures, scientific techniques, all business commerce and trade are up for being remixed and reconsumed. The ultimate melting pot of thought, image, and existence.

References

  1. Bain, C. et al. (2002). Transitions in society: the challenge of change. Toronto: Oxford University Press.